Godard in Wall-eyed 3D

IN ENGLISH. Godard’s 3D-film Adieu au langage (2014) shapes a new cinematic aesthetic of 3D that is decidedly non-immersive. Placing the film in the history of Godard’s cinema and in the history of 3D cinema, Mathias Bonde Korsgaard argues that the film at once points to a potential crisis of the 3D film as well as its radical artistic possibilities.

‘Girls Are the New Men’: An Interview with Pawel Pawlikowski

INTERVIEW. After cutting his teeth as a filmmaker with a series of acclaimed documentaries for the BBC during the 1990s, Pawel Pawlikowski (born 1957) was named Most Promising Newcomer by BAFTA for his feature début Last Resort (2000); the follow-up, My Summer of Love (2004), won the BAFTA award for Best British Film of the Year. But neither picture felt obviously British, since each reflected a border-zone existence (literal or figurative) in a sometimes beautiful, sometimes horrific country.

Hannibal’s Tasty Paradox

IN ENGLISH. Why do we rarely see him carry out the actual act of killing while we often get to see him eat a fancy dinner? Whenever the sadistic cannibal Hannibal Lecter enjoys another gourmet meal, this broadcast TV series displays culinary cannibalism with luxurious aesthetics that could rival most cooking shows. But why? Mads Møller Andersen analyzes the many appeals of NBC’s Hannibal and especially its food strategies.

Better Call Gilligan: Revisiting the Audiovisual Design of Breaking Bad and...

IN ENGLISH. The drama series Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul have been lauded for their unique audiovisual design, often described as “artsy” or “cinematic.” In this article, which is based on interviews with cinematographer Arthur Albert, sound designer Edmond J. Coblentz and supervising sound editor Nick Forshager, Andreas Halskov revisits the audiovisual style in the two shows, trying to define Vince Gilligan’s signature style.

The Bizarreness of Snow White

IN ENGLISH. The animated version of Snow White, produced by Fleischer Studios in 1933, possesses a richly multifaceted oddness. It is a bizarre film full of digressions and inconsistencies, humorously riffing on the original fairytale. Ethan de Seife analyses this wonderfully bizarre film, which combines musical digressions with elements of both surrealism and realism.

When Television Grew Up: David Simon, Modern America and the Maturing...

FEATURE. The showrunner David Simon was a central flagship for HBO, when they revolutionized the TV-landscape in the beginning of the 2000s, and even in the highly competitive streaming landscape of today he continues to create relevant drama series that often utilize the past to comment on the present. In this interview, Simon talkes about his approach to realism and long-form storytelling and his views on the changes in American society and the American TV landscape.

“It all begins with the story”: An Interview with Tim Hunter

INTERVIEW. Tim Hunter is an esteemed film and TV director who began his career as a writer of independent movies, before going on to become one of the most famous episode directors in American television. 16:9 met him in Los Angeles for a talk about his career, about the film and television industries, about his predilection for stories and film history and about the changes in the mediascape. Fittingly, the interview is lengthy, inclusive and anecdotal, forming a sort of double feature that tells the small story of one director and writer in Hollywood and a larger story of Hollywood itself and the changes in the industry.

In English Archive 2003-2013

There are many more features, reviews, and anatomies in English in our extensive archive covering the period 2003-2013.

“A Monster for the Ages” – Anton Chigurh and the Image...

IN ENGLISH. Anton Chigurh, the main villain of the Coen Brothers’ No Country for Old Men (2007), has been called a ”Monster for the Ages.” What makes him so? Jens Kjeldgaard-Christiansen shows how a moral psychological perspective can render the aesthetically supercharged antisociality of the character intelligible.

Theatrical Transcendence: Mizoguchi, Noh Theatre and Film Style

IN ENGLISH. Kenji Mizoguchi remains as one of Japan’s most accomplished filmmakers. His work called upon a number of influences, not just from his cinematic peers, but also from his own culture. One such influence which was prevalent throughout his life as a director was the Japanese theatre, particularly traditional noh theatre which was used as both a stylistic and narrative device. In our latest article, Paul Spicer explores this relationship by examining two of his most important works of the 1950s.