A Mere Formality

VIDEO-ESSAY. Hou Hsiao-Hsien is a great, but somewhat underappreciated Taiwanese auteur, known for his long takes and slow pacing. In this video-essay, Adrian Martin and Cristina Álvarez López explore his unique style as seen in a scene from the 1995-film Good Men, Good Women. Mirroring the tempo and attention to detail in Good Men, Good Women, this video-essay tries to capture the very essence of Hou Hsiao-Hsien’s aesthetic.

Unsung Heroes and Silent Pioneers: An Interview with Sound Designer Walter...

IN ENGLISH. Preparing a book on sound design in films and television, Andreas Halskov has talked with Walter Murch about film sound, listening and technology, focusing on Murch’s sonic inventiveness and his long-standing collaborations with George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola.

Hannibal’s Tasty Paradox

IN ENGLISH. Why do we rarely see him carry out the actual act of killing while we often get to see him eat a fancy dinner? Whenever the sadistic cannibal Hannibal Lecter enjoys another gourmet meal, this broadcast TV series displays culinary cannibalism with luxurious aesthetics that could rival most cooking shows. But why? Mads Møller Andersen analyzes the many appeals of NBC’s Hannibal and especially its food strategies.

Quiet Qualities and Qualified Quietude – the Sound Design of Gravity

IN ENGLISH. In space no one can hear you scream. This presents an audiovisual paradox. Because how does one create an auralverisimilitude in a space film, if virtually no sound is heard in outer space? In this article Andreas Halskov focuses on the sound of Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity (2013), a sound design or sound score which in many ways is similar to that of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

What’s the Frequency, David? Noise and Interference in the films of...

VIDEO-ESSAY. The films of David Lynch often feature electronic devices that don’t work and people who seem to be speaking 'on different frequencies'. In this video-essay, Andreas Halskov explores noise, interference and faulty wiring as common elements in the works of David Lynch.

Between Two Worlds: The Competing Moods of David Lynch

VIDEO-ESSAY. David Lynch’ films are full of paradoxes, and in this video-essay Andreas Halskov deals with two of the Lynchian paradoxes (the genre paradox andthe register paradox), as seen in three of David Lynch’s famous productions: Blue Velvet (1986), Twin Peaks (ABC, 1990-1991) and Wild at Heart (1990).

“A Monster for the Ages” – Anton Chigurh and the Image...

IN ENGLISH. Anton Chigurh, the main villain of the Coen Brothers’ No Country for Old Men (2007), has been called a ”Monster for the Ages.” What makes him so? Jens Kjeldgaard-Christiansen shows how a moral psychological perspective can render the aesthetically supercharged antisociality of the character intelligible.

No Place Like Home: Returning to Twin Peaks

IN ENGLISH. In terms of style and content, the new Twin Peaks is radically different from the original series, and it includes abstract references to different David Lynch productions while combining familiar faces and places with new situations, stylistic choices and characters. In many ways, the new series is about “returning,” about going back and trying to rediscover or even recreate Twin Peaks, but the revival is not a nostalgic revisit to a cozy, All-American small-town. That gum you like has come back in a different style.

Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

VIDEO-ESSAY. In this visual essay Jakob Isak Nielsen takes a closer look at the contribution of camera movement to “the language of cinema”. He suggests that any camera movement will serve one or more six proposed functions.

Better Call Gilligan: Revisiting the Audiovisual Design of Breaking Bad and...

IN ENGLISH. The drama series Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul have been lauded for their unique audiovisual design, often described as “artsy” or “cinematic.” In this article, which is based on interviews with cinematographer Arthur Albert, sound designer Edmond J. Coblentz and supervising sound editor Nick Forshager, Andreas Halskov revisits the audiovisual style in the two shows, trying to define Vince Gilligan’s signature style.