No Voiding Time: A Deformative Videoessay

VIDEO-ESSAY. Deformative criticism is a playful approach to film analysis that creates a new aesthetic object from the film being analysed. In 'No Voiding Time’, Alan O’Leary divides Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice into its individual component shots on four screens and treats the sound for musicality rather than sense. The result is an absurdist artefact that celebrates an already perplexing film.

A Tale of Two Shows about Profiling and Criminal Psychology: Mindhunter...

IN ENGLISH. In the fierce competition of the streaming giants, original content is a key battleground. However, labels may be deceptive. Arguing that consumption modes help shape storytelling strategies, Søren Bastholm explores the two alleged ‘Netflix Originals’ – Mindhunter and Manhunt: Unabomber – and the differences between the show Netflix commissioned and the one Netflix picked up after its premiere.

“A Monster for the Ages”: Anton Chigurh and the Image of...

IN ENGLISH. Anton Chigurh, the main villain of the Coen Brothers’ No Country for Old Men (2007), has been called a ”Monster for the Ages.” What makes him so? Jens Kjeldgaard-Christiansen shows how a moral psychological perspective can render the aesthetically supercharged antisociality of the character intelligible.

What’s the Frequency, David? Noise and Interference in the films of...

VIDEO-ESSAY. The films of David Lynch often feature electronic devices that don’t work and people who seem to be speaking 'on different frequencies'. In this video-essay, Andreas Halskov explores noise, interference and faulty wiring as common elements in the works of David Lynch.

Theatrical Transcendence: Mizoguchi, Noh Theatre and Film Style

IN ENGLISH. Kenji Mizoguchi remains as one of Japan’s most accomplished filmmakers. His work called upon a number of influences, not just from his cinematic peers, but also from his own culture. One such influence which was prevalent throughout his life as a director was the Japanese theatre, particularly traditional noh theatre which was used as both a stylistic and narrative device. In our latest article, Paul Spicer explores this relationship by examining two of his most important works of the 1950s.

When Television Grew Up: David Simon, Modern America and the Maturing...

FEATURE. The showrunner David Simon was a central flagship for HBO, when they revolutionized the TV-landscape in the beginning of the 2000s, and even in the highly competitive streaming landscape of today he continues to create relevant drama series that often utilize the past to comment on the present. In this interview, Simon talkes about his approach to realism and long-form storytelling and his views on the changes in American society and the American TV landscape.

‘Girls Are the New Men’: An Interview with Pawel Pawlikowski

INTERVIEW. After cutting his teeth as a filmmaker with a series of acclaimed documentaries for the BBC during the 1990s, Pawel Pawlikowski (born 1957) was named Most Promising Newcomer by BAFTA for his feature début Last Resort (2000); the follow-up, My Summer of Love (2004), won the BAFTA award for Best British Film of the Year. But neither picture felt obviously British, since each reflected a border-zone existence (literal or figurative) in a sometimes beautiful, sometimes horrific country.

Better Call Gilligan: Revisiting the Audiovisual Design of Breaking Bad and...

IN ENGLISH. The drama series Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul have been lauded for their unique audiovisual design, often described as “artsy” or “cinematic.” In this article, which is based on interviews with cinematographer Arthur Albert, sound designer Edmond J. Coblentz and supervising sound editor Nick Forshager, Andreas Halskov revisits the audiovisual style in the two shows, trying to define Vince Gilligan’s signature style.

“So-Bad-It’s-Good”: The Room and the Paradoxical Appeal of Bad Films

IN ENGLISH. What makes some bad films “so-bad-they’re-good”? In our latest article, Marc Hye-Knudsen and Mathias Clasen shed light on the paradoxical appeal of bad films by bringing contemporary humor research and cognitive film theory to bear on Tommy Wiseau’s cult classic The Room, often heralded as “the best worst movie ever made.”

Between Two Worlds: The Competing Moods of David Lynch

VIDEO-ESSAY. David Lynch’ films are full of paradoxes, and in this video-essay Andreas Halskov deals with two of the Lynchian paradoxes (the genre paradox andthe register paradox), as seen in three of David Lynch’s famous productions: Blue Velvet (1986), Twin Peaks (ABC, 1990-1991) and Wild at Heart (1990).