No Voiding Time: A Deformative Videoessay

VIDEO-ESSAY. Deformative criticism is a playful approach to film analysis that creates a new aesthetic object from the film being analysed. In 'No Voiding Time’, Alan O’Leary divides Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice into its individual component shots on four screens and treats the sound for musicality rather than sense. The result is an absurdist artefact that celebrates an already perplexing film.

Between Two Worlds: The Competing Moods of David Lynch

VIDEO-ESSAY. David Lynch’ films are full of paradoxes, and in this video-essay Andreas Halskov deals with two of the Lynchian paradoxes (the genre paradox andthe register paradox), as seen in three of David Lynch’s famous productions: Blue Velvet (1986), Twin Peaks (ABC, 1990-1991) and Wild at Heart (1990).

Master of None, Atlanta, and Audience Engagement in Contemporary US TV...

IN ENGLISH. How do contemporary television distribution methods and consumption practices influence TV comedies? How are texts, production routines and ways of engaging the audience reshaped? Critically acclaimed TV series Master of None (2016-) and Atlanta (2016-) are good examples of such deep tranformations, leading to a reinvention of the comedy genre.

Better Call Gilligan: Revisiting the Audiovisual Design of Breaking Bad and...

IN ENGLISH. The drama series Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul have been lauded for their unique audiovisual design, often described as “artsy” or “cinematic.” In this article, which is based on interviews with cinematographer Arthur Albert, sound designer Edmond J. Coblentz and supervising sound editor Nick Forshager, Andreas Halskov revisits the audiovisual style in the two shows, trying to define Vince Gilligan’s signature style.

Theatrical Transcendence: Mizoguchi, Noh Theatre and Film Style

IN ENGLISH. Kenji Mizoguchi remains as one of Japan’s most accomplished filmmakers. His work called upon a number of influences, not just from his cinematic peers, but also from his own culture. One such influence which was prevalent throughout his life as a director was the Japanese theatre, particularly traditional noh theatre which was used as both a stylistic and narrative device. In our latest article, Paul Spicer explores this relationship by examining two of his most important works of the 1950s.

Audience involving strategies in Sherlock

VIDEO-ESSAY. Fans of the BBC’s Sherlock very actively have taken the show to their hearts. How does Sherlock succeed in involving its worldwide audiences in the show? In this video-essay Palle Schantz Lauridsen examines audience involving strategies within and around the show.

‘Girls Are the New Men’: An Interview with Pawel Pawlikowski

INTERVIEW. After cutting his teeth as a filmmaker with a series of acclaimed documentaries for the BBC during the 1990s, Pawel Pawlikowski (born 1957) was named Most Promising Newcomer by BAFTA for his feature début Last Resort (2000); the follow-up, My Summer of Love (2004), won the BAFTA award for Best British Film of the Year. But neither picture felt obviously British, since each reflected a border-zone existence (literal or figurative) in a sometimes beautiful, sometimes horrific country.

Quiet Qualities and Qualified Quietude: The Sound Design of Gravity

IN ENGLISH. In space no one can hear you scream. This presents an audiovisual paradox. Because how does one create an auralverisimilitude in a space film, if virtually no sound is heard in outer space? In this article Andreas Halskov focuses on the sound of Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity (2013), a sound design or sound score which in many ways is similar to that of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

“It all begins with the story”: An Interview with Tim Hunter

INTERVIEW. Tim Hunter is an esteemed film and TV director who began his career as a writer of independent movies, before going on to become one of the most famous episode directors in American television. 16:9 met him in Los Angeles for a talk about his career, about the film and television industries, about his predilection for stories and film history and about the changes in the mediascape. Fittingly, the interview is lengthy, inclusive and anecdotal, forming a sort of double feature that tells the small story of one director and writer in Hollywood and a larger story of Hollywood itself and the changes in the industry.

The Origins of Ruben Östlund’s Long-Take Style

VIDEO-ESSAY. Having won the Palme d’Or in 2017, it is no surprise that Ruben Östlund draws from other prizewinning directors like Michael Haneke and Roy Andersson. But you wouldn’t expect a Palme d’Or-winning director to find stylistic inspiration in skiing films and on YouTube. Mathias Bonde Korsgaard traces the unlikely origins of Östlund’s long-take style.