“A Monster for the Ages” – Anton Chigurh and the Image...

IN ENGLISH. Anton Chigurh, the main villain of the Coen Brothers’ No Country for Old Men (2007), has been called a ”Monster for the Ages.” What makes him so? Jens Kjeldgaard-Christiansen shows how a moral psychological perspective can render the aesthetically supercharged antisociality of the character intelligible.

The Origins of Ruben Östlund’s Long-Take Style

VIDEO-ESSAY. Having won the Palme d’Or in 2017, it is no surprise that Ruben Östlund draws from other prizewinning directors like Michael Haneke and Roy Andersson. But you wouldn’t expect a Palme d’Or-winning director to find stylistic inspiration in skiing films and on YouTube. Mathias Bonde Korsgaard traces the unlikely origins of Östlund’s long-take style.

‘Girls Are the New Men’: An Interview with Pawel Pawlikowski

INTERVIEW. After cutting his teeth as a filmmaker with a series of acclaimed documentaries for the BBC during the 1990s, Pawel Pawlikowski (born 1957) was named Most Promising Newcomer by BAFTA for his feature début Last Resort (2000); the follow-up, My Summer of Love (2004), won the BAFTA award for Best British Film of the Year. But neither picture felt obviously British, since each reflected a border-zone existence (literal or figurative) in a sometimes beautiful, sometimes horrific country.

iZombie: The New Voice of the Zombie Apocalypse

IN ENGLISH. Zombies have never been more popular than in twenty-first century media as they spread virally from cinema and computer games to graphic novels and television. With each new incarnation, they undergo a transformation, sometimes subtle and sometimes drastic, but these changes impact upon how we engage with and understand the zombie. Stacey Abbotts investigates this phenomenon, focusing on one modern zombie series: iZombie (CW 2015-).

The Frozen Frame as an Immortal Object – Reflections on Chris...

IN ENGLISH. Chris Marker’s La jetée (1962) has intrigued many critics, who have for the most part focused on the narrative and the form of the film. Instead of pursuing this angle, Sébastien Doubinsky explores how La jetéequestions the notions of memory, history and power through an artificial construction that goes against the conventional definition of a moving picture.

When Television Grew Up: David Simon, Modern America and the Maturing...

FEATURE. The showrunner David Simon was a central flagship for HBO, when they revolutionized the TV-landscape in the beginning of the 2000s, and even in the highly competitive streaming landscape of today he continues to create relevant drama series that often utilize the past to comment on the present. In this interview, Simon talkes about his approach to realism and long-form storytelling and his views on the changes in American society and the American TV landscape.

What’s the Frequency, David? Noise and Interference in the films of...

VIDEO-ESSAY. The films of David Lynch often feature electronic devices that don’t work and people who seem to be speaking 'on different frequencies'. In this video-essay, Andreas Halskov explores noise, interference and faulty wiring as common elements in the works of David Lynch.

In English Archive 2003-2013

There are many more features, reviews, and anatomies in English in our extensive archive covering the period 2003-2013.

“So-Bad-It’s-Good”: The Room and the Paradoxical Appeal of Bad Films

IN ENGLISH. What makes some bad films “so-bad-they’re-good”? In our latest article, Marc Hye-Knudsen and Mathias Clasen shed light on the paradoxical appeal of bad films by bringing contemporary humor research and cognitive film theory to bear on Tommy Wiseau’s cult classic The Room, often heralded as “the best worst movie ever made.”