The Art of Discomfort: Cinematography and Visual Design in Succession and...

Did you know that Jesse Armstrong screened "Festen" for his entire crew before shooting the first season of "Succession" – or that the visual style was inspired by Annie Leibovitz and her famous photojournalism? And did you know that the visual style in "The White Lotus" was inspired by the Madonna Inn and local artworks featuring Hawaiian workers in the pineapple fields? Find out more in this interview-based article about the cinematography and visual design in two of the most interesting TV series from 2021? N.B.: The article contains spoilers.

The Design Program and Color Palette of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

IN ENGLISH. An unlikely route to originality: see how the unusual visual design and color pallette of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is inspired by Erwin Fieger’s photographs.

Audience involving strategies in Sherlock

VIDEO-ESSAY. Fans of the BBC’s Sherlock very actively have taken the show to their hearts. How does Sherlock succeed in involving its worldwide audiences in the show? In this video-essay Palle Schantz Lauridsen examines audience involving strategies within and around the show.

169 Seconds: Causality in The Square

169 SECONDS. Film narratives often follow a logic of causality, with one incident naturally leading to another. In Ruben Östlund’s The Square (2017) we seem to witness such typical relations of cause and effect, yet the narrative gradually spirals out of control: actions do have consequences, but in the truly plural sense of one action leading to more than one outcome. In this jubilee installment of 169 Seconds, Mathias Bonde Korsgaard explores the film’s narrative mechanisms.

169 Seconds: Una mujer reflejada / A Reflected Woman

169 SECONDS. In this installment of our jubilee series of 169 Seconds, Catherine Grant collects mirror and reflection sequences from the 2017 Chilean film Una mujer fantástica and ponders their significance in this narrative of queer melancholia and mourning. The film stars Daniela Vega, a trans actress and mezzo-soprano, who, in the closing moments of the film, sings the song that accompanies the essay: “Ombra mai fu”, the opening aria from Händel’s 1738 opera Serse.

The Frozen Frame as an Immortal Object: Reflections on Chris Marker’s...

IN ENGLISH. Chris Marker’s La jetée (1962) has intrigued many critics, who have for the most part focused on the narrative and the form of the film. Instead of pursuing this angle, Sébastien Doubinsky explores how La jetéequestions the notions of memory, history and power through an artificial construction that goes against the conventional definition of a moving picture.

Better Call Gilligan: Revisiting the Audiovisual Design of Breaking Bad and...

IN ENGLISH. The drama series Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul have been lauded for their unique audiovisual design, often described as “artsy” or “cinematic.” In this article, which is based on interviews with cinematographer Arthur Albert, sound designer Edmond J. Coblentz and supervising sound editor Nick Forshager, Andreas Halskov revisits the audiovisual style in the two shows, trying to define Vince Gilligan’s signature style.

Unsung Heroes and Silent Pioneers: An Interview with Sound Designer Walter...

IN ENGLISH. Preparing a book on sound design in films and television, Andreas Halskov has talked with Walter Murch about film sound, listening and technology, focusing on Murch’s sonic inventiveness and his long-standing collaborations with George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola.

Master of None, Atlanta, and Audience Engagement in Contemporary US TV...

IN ENGLISH. How do contemporary television distribution methods and consumption practices influence TV comedies? How are texts, production routines and ways of engaging the audience reshaped? Critically acclaimed TV series Master of None (2016-) and Atlanta (2016-) are good examples of such deep tranformations, leading to a reinvention of the comedy genre.

No Place Like Home: Returning to Twin Peaks

IN ENGLISH. In terms of style and content, the new Twin Peaks is radically different from the original series, and it includes abstract references to different David Lynch productions while combining familiar faces and places with new situations, stylistic choices and characters. In many ways, the new series is about “returning,” about going back and trying to rediscover or even recreate Twin Peaks, but the revival is not a nostalgic revisit to a cozy, All-American small-town. That gum you like has come back in a different style.